The P.T. Shearer House and Garden

Photo by Albert Mach
The P.T. Shearer House is a classic Greek Revival home built during the early 1840s making it one of the first brick homes in historic Moorefield. The house was constructed in three sections; the first and front section of the house was built for Judge James W.F. Allen. Judge Allen practiced law while living in the house; his law office was located next to the house, on the north side.
The Allen’s sold the property in 1853 to Philip Thornton Shearer for whom the house is known. It is thought the back wing of the house was added by Shearer. Philip and his family resided in the house while operating a mercantile next door in the building now housing Fox’s Pizza. Shearer was involved in the community and a staunch member of the Presbyterian Church. In 1901, at the age of 75, Philip Shearer lost the house and store building due to debts, both business and personal. Presbyterian minister, George While, purchased the property for his daughter, Janie White Gilkeson, wife of John W. Gilkeson, who was a local merchant. Nannie Bell Gilkeson McNeill, daughter of Janie and John Gilkeson inherited the house in 1935. Annie Shobe was the next owner of the house. Annie was the county’s WV Extension Agent for numerous years and strong supporter and promoter of Heritage Weekend and local crafts.
The house has been completely renovated house while retaining the home’s original architectural details such as the Ionic column fireplace mantle and built-in hidden storage cabinets in the front parlor, various styled door and window trim, hard wood floors and a elegant three story staircase.
A south facing side porch opens onto a brick patio with a large koi pond. The immaculately landscaped fenced yard has mature trees, peonies, Boxwoods, lilac bushes and other blooming shrubs as well as a vegetable garden with a red raspberry patch.
Location: 124 South Main St, Moorefield
Open Courtesy of David Pratt and Billie Jo Biddle

The P.T. Shearer House and Garden